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Moxibustion

Moxibustion involves the heating of acupuncture points with smoldering mugwort herb (known as moxa). Moxibustion stimulates circulation, counteracts cold and dampness in the body, and promotes the smooth flow of blood and qi. This safe, non-invasive technique may be used alone, but it is generally used in conjunction with acupuncture treatment.

Tui Na/Gua Sha

Tui na means "pushing grasping," and is a powerful form of Chinese medical bodywork. Based on the same Oriental medical principles as acupuncture, tui na seeks to improve the flow of qi through the meridian channels. Tui na is particularly effective for conditions involving muscles, tendons and joints, such as structural misalignment, orthopedic problems and sports injuries. It can also be used to treat internal diseases.

​Gua Sha​ means literally "to scrape away fever" in Chinese (more loosely, "to scrape away disease by allowing the disease to escape as sandy-looking objects through the skin"). Gua sha involves repeated pressured strokes over lubricated skin with a smooth edge, commonly a ceramic Chinese soup spoon is used. The smooth edge is placed against the pre-oiled skin surface, pressed down firmly, and then moved down the muscles or along the pathway of the acupuncture meridians, along the surface of the skin, with each stroke being about 4-6 inches long. This causes extravasation of blood from the peripheral capillaries (petechiae) and may result in sub-cutaneous blemishing (ecchymosis), which usually takes 2–4 days to fade. Sha rash does not represent capillary rupture as in bruising, as is evidenced by the immediate fading of petechiae to echymosis, and the rapid resolution of sha as compared to bruising. The color of sha varies according to the severity of the patient's blood stasis—which may correlate with the nature, severity and type of their disorder—appearing from a dark blue-black to a light pink, but is most often a shade of red.

Practitioners tend to follow the tradition they were taught to obtain sha: typically using either gua sha or fire cupping. The techniques are not used together.

Cupping/Fire Cupping

Cupping is an ancient technique, used in many cultures, in which a special cup is applied to the skin and held in place by suction. The suction draws superficial tissue into the cup, which may either be left in place or moved along the body. Cupping brings fresh blood to the area and helps improve circulation. Traditional cupping, sometimes referred to as “fire cupping," uses heat to create a vacuum-like suction inside of glass cups. In modern times, cups that use a small pump to create suction have also been introduced.

 

NOTE: Dr. Ashton has permanently re-located to  806 N. Emily St., Ludington, MI 49431. Contact Dr. Ashton at (231) 480-1598

This web site will serve
only
Dr. Ashton's Michigan practice.

Dr. Ashton's Clinic Hours:

Tue., Wed, Thu., 10:00am to 4:00pm

Other appointment times by special arrangement.

Phone: (231) 480-1598 

e-mail: pointsofhealing@yahoo.com

* Points of Healing Acupuncture in Florida is now Englewood Acupuncture.
Contact Dr. Erica Nabers at the existing number (941) 473-7031 to set up an appointment in Florida only.

Michigan Season: June 01 thru Sept. 30

Address: Ludington, MI 49431 I am seeing patients at several locations, including home visits, depending on their needs. Please call to set an appointment in the appropriate treatment space.

MI Phone: (941)-830-5112

e-mail: pointsofhealing@yahoo.com